D. Experience-Based Knowledge

Earlier you considered two important sources of evidence: the best available research, and policies about assistive technology interventions. Experience-based knowledge is another source of evidence to help guide your decision-making. Experience-based knowledge is the “know-how” that comes from solving problems, overcoming barriers, and making decisions in everyday life.

CONNECT identified parents and practitioners from around the country who have experience-based knowledge on the topic of assistive technology interventions and invited them to share their perspectives. These spokespersons are:

Patsy Pierce
Dr. Pierce has worked as a speech-language pathologist for over 20 years specializing in children with severe, complex communication needs. She has also been the Associate Director for Early Childhood Research and Practice in the Center for Literacy and Disability Studies at UNC-CH and a professor in the Division of Speech and Hearing Services and School of Education at UNC-CH. Listen as Dr. Pierce explains three important things to consider when working with children with disabilities who use assistive technology.
Robin Wisner
Robin Wisner is the mother of four boys, ages 18, 15, and 13 (twins). Her thirteen year old twins have identical physical disabilities and communicate using Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC). Because of her children’s disabilities, Robin has educated herself about ways to help her sons learn language on their communication devices and shares what she has learned through conferences, workshops, and other activities. Listen as Robin discusses some key things teachers should keep in mind when working with children who use assistive technology devices.
Sheila Bridges-Bond
Dr. Sheila Bridges-Bond, a professor in the Department of Communication Disorders (DCD) at North Carolina Central University, discusses things you should consider when working with children from diverse backgrounds. She is an expert on augmentative/alternative communication service delivery to culturally/linguistically diverse families. Dr. Bridges-Bond is also the founder/director of the Assistive Technology for Infants and Preschoolers Project, (ATIPP) an inclusive therapeutic preschool that implements assistive technology (AT) supporting communication, literacy and learning.

Now listen to audio clips from phone interviews with these spokespersons and identify important considerations relating to effective assistive technology interventions.

Audio 5.1: Patsy Pierce

Dr. Pierce has worked as a speech-language pathologist for over 20 years specializing in children with severe, complex communication needs. She has also been the Associate Director for Early Childhood Research and Practice in the Center for Literacy and Disability Studies at UNC-CH and a professor in the Division of Speech and Hearing Services and School of Education at UNC-CH. Listen as Dr. Pierce explains three important things to consider when working with children with disabilities who use assistive technology.

Audio 5.2: Robin Wisner

Robin Wisner is the mother of four boys, ages 18, 15, and 13 (twins). Her thirteen year old twins have identical physical disabilities and communicate using - Lloyd, Fuller, & Arvidson (1997) ">Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC). Because of her children’s disabilities, Robin has educated herself about ways to help her sons learn language on their communication devices and shares what she has learned through conferences, workshops, and other activities. Listen as Robin discusses some key things teachers should keep in mind when working with children who use assistive technology devices.

Audio 5.3: Sheila Bridges-Bond

Dr. Sheila Bridges-Bond, a professor in the Department of Communication Disorders (DCD) at North Carolina Central University, discusses things you should consider when working with children from diverse backgrounds. She is an expert on augmentative/alternative communication service delivery to culturally/linguistically diverse families. Dr. Bridges-Bond is also the founder/director of the Assistive Technology for Infants and Preschoolers Project, (ATIPP) an inclusive therapeutic preschool that implements assistive technology (AT) supporting communication, literacy and learning.